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Thread: Howdy from Galveston Island, TX

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Galveston Island, TX
    Posts
    3

    Howdy from Galveston Island, TX

    Howdy!

    We pulled our daughter out of the local high school in October and have been deschooling until this month. Now we are ready to get rolling and I am freaking out. We are stuck in between wanting to follow a well defined path and not wanting to do that at all. I don't want her sitting at home doing the same work (reading the same assigned uninteresting books) she would have done in school. Maybe to some degree, but I am looking for a curriculum that she will enjoy and want to stick with. That's asking a lot of a teenager and her mother in my search.

    I'll post my my specific curriculum quandary on another thread, but I'm caught between worrying about her getting behind, staying on track with her peers, having the freedom to explore. She is so much happier, but I'm afraid I'm not together enough ( even with hundreds of hours of research) to pull together the right curriculum for her.

    Advice welcome!

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    271
    Once you get to the high school stage, in my opinion a teen should have a LOT of say in their education. I would have some deep discussions with your daughter about what she wants to get out of her education, what motivates her, and what her personal goals are for this school year. Once you know exactly where she stands and compare her goals for herself to your goals for her, its likely that you'll be able to come to a good compromise about how things could play out.

    As an example, if she really, really wanted to learn the violin and feels she should be able to practice 6 hours a day of violin...and if you really, really want her to do traditional coursework of science, history, math, and english and were thinking maybe she should spend about an hour a day on the violin, then you can definitely find a good balance. You could possibly choose a program like Time4Learning that lets her independently cover all the main courses online, and then as long as she has done the specified amount of lessons per day, the other time could be her own to follow her passions.

    There are just so many ways to create a great high school homeschool experience, and no one student's will look the same. By giving your daughter a ton of input into what this year will look like, she is much more likely to stay motivated to meet her goals (and yours!) BEST of luck to you both!!
    bailbrae, Inmom and tiallarising like this.
    Creating this site has been a dream come true!! I hope it will be a help and encouragement to you in your homeschooling journey!!!

    Sincerely,
    Kerry - Site Admin

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Galveston Island, TX
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the advice! I am really so caught in what we are "supposed" to do vs. what is best for her overall happiness and education. I mean, aren't there rules? I want her to be able to attend a college if she wants, so I feel like I ought to direct her so she can achieve what she wants. But, what does that mean and what do I need to do to make that happen.

    She helped chose the curriculum as she said she wants structure, so she says she happy taking core classes, but we'll see. Frankly, she spends a lot of time photographing, video editing and surfing when the surf is good. I'm ok with that, but I'm unsure about these programs and what I need to do specifically to ensure she can get into college (if she wants that).

  4. #4
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    23
    I don't know that there are a blanket set of "rules" when it comes to homeschooling and graduating high school. Sure, each state has standards that need to be met, and sure each college/university/trade school/etc. has admission policies, but I don't know that there is any general set of rules to follow.

    My advice would be to keep a transcript (and there are a number of ways to do that, here is a link for an example: https://letshomeschoolhighschool.com/...l-transcripts/) so you have it regardless of what she wants to do after high school. Most jobs will accept "I was homeschooled" in response to a request for a diploma nowadays, so I don't think that should be a concern. Once she knows where she wants to go school, if she does, then you guys can reach out to that school to see what they need from homeschoolers. It may be JUST the transcript is all they'll want. It may be that they don't care at all about the transcripts and your daughter will just need to take some sort of admission exam/ It could be some of both, lol.

    Continue poking around the forums here too...you'll encounter many members who are either homeschool graduates themselves, that went to college, or you'll find parents who graduated a homeschooler that went to college. They are awesome resources and are always willing to share their experiences.
    tiallarising likes this.

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